Home My Military Vision MISCELLANEOUS EYE CONDITIONS – Militay Entrance Standards for Medical Fitness
MISCELLANEOUS EYE CONDITIONS – Militay Entrance Standards for Medical Fitness
Friday, 27 March 2009 23:00

 

These are the Army military regulations used at MEPS and military processing centers for the entrance vision standards for eye diseases and visual acuity.

 

This is an extrapolated version of AR 40-501 2-12.  This section describes eye diseases and visual acuity standards for entrance into the United States military.  Included here are the disqualifying conditions, a brief description of the condition, and what challenges a condition or disease may create for a new soldier.

 

This section relates to miscellaneous defects and conditions of the eyes that are disqualifying.

 

I am interested in joining the military.  What are the military regulations and standards regarding miscellaneous eye conditions?

 

 

i. Miscellaneous defects and conditions.

 

Disqualifying Conditions:

 

1.  Abnormal visual fields due to disease of the eye or central nervous system, or trauma

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Visual field defects are typically indications of more serious diseases of the brain or eyes.  These conditions would be disqualifying.  Abnormal visual fields can limit a soldier’s ability to train.  However, the disease causing the abnormal vision fields will most likely require extensive medical care and/or testing.

 

 

2.  Anophthalmos, absence of an eye
Congenital anophthalmos, born with no eye 
Other disorders of globe

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Anophthalmos is when one eye is not present.  One can be born with this condition or it can happen from trauma and/or surgery.  This condition is disqualifying.  Only having one can will significantly limit a soldier’s peripheral vision and limit a soldier’s ability to train.

 

3.  Current asthenopia, eye pain

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Asthenopia is eye pain and/or strain.  Eye pain can be cause by trauma, inflammation and/or an infection.  Eye strain can be cause by eye muscle fatigue and/or focusing problems.  These can limit a soldier’s ability to train.  This is a general term.

 

4.  Unilateral or bilateral non-familial exophthalmos

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Exophthalmos is the protrusion of the globe from the orbit.  This can be cause by multiple conditions.  Typically thyroid problems and/or mass or tumors behind the eye can cause this.  Often exophthalmos can cause dry eyes and eye irritation.  The systemic condition that cause exophthalmos (grave’s disease) are disqualifying. These can limit a soldier’s ability to train and cause problems in extreme combat environments.

 

5.  Glaucoma, including, but not limited to primary, secondary, or pre-glaucoma as evidenced by intraocular pressure above 21 millimeters of mercury (mmHg), or changes in the optic disc or visual field loss associated with glaucoma

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Glaucoma is a disease that affects one’s optic nerve.  Over time the optic nerve is damage, initially causing peripheral visual field loss that will slowly become more advanced.  Glaucoma cannot be cured.  This condition requires medical treatment and monitoring which can affect a soldier’s ability to train and deploy.

 

6.  Loss of normal pupillary reflex reactions to accommodation or light, including Adie’s syndrome, is disqualifying.

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Pupillary reflex abnormalities can be related to horner’s syndrome, traumatic iris damage, adie’s pupil, and/or third nerve palsy.  These can be indications of more serious systemic diseases or previous trauma.

 

7.  Current night blindness

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Night blindness occurs when one’s ability to dark adapt is altered.  This is typically cause by retinitis pigmentosa (RP).  This is an inherited condition and can cause peripheral vision defects, night blindness and poor central vision. Night blindness can also be caused by advanced glaucoma, drugs, vitamin A deficiency, gyrate atrophy or choroideremia.  These will limit the ability of a soldier to train, deploy, successfully complete basic training, and/or can cause significant vision loss.

 

8.  Retained intraocular foreign body

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Retained intraocular foreign bodies can often cause secondary problems like inflammation and/or cataracts.  This can be progressive and cause significant loss of vision.  This can limit one’s ability to train and deploy.

 

9.  Current or history of any organic disease of the eye or adnexa not specified above, which threatens vision or visual function, is disqualifying.

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

This is an opened ended regulation.  It state any condition of the eye that limits one’s vision or visual function can be disqualifying.

 

 


 

 

Below is the exact AR 40-501 military army regulation for this section of eye disease and vision.

AR 40-501 2–12. Eyes


i. Miscellaneous defects and conditions.


(1) Current or history of abnormal visual fields due to disease of the eye or central nervous system (368.4), or trauma (368.9) is disqualifying.
(2) Absence of an eye, clinical anophthalmos, unspecified congenital (743.00) or acquired, or current or history of there disorders of globe (360.8) is disqualifying.
(3) Current asthenopia (368.13), is disqualifying.
(4) Current unilateral or bilateral non-familial exophthalmos (376) is disqualifying.
(5) Current or history of glaucoma (365), including, but not limited to primary, secondary, or pre-glaucoma as evidenced by intraocular pressure above 21 millimeters of mercury (mmHg), or changes in the optic disc or visual fieldl oss associated with glaucoma, is disqualifying.
(6) Current loss of normal pupillary reflex reactions to accommodation (367.5) or light (379.4), including Adie’s syndrome, is disqualifying.
(7) Current night blindness (368.6) is disqualifying.
(8) Current or history of retained intraocular foreign body (360) is disqualifying.
(9) Current or history of any organic disease of the eye (360) or adnexa (376) not specified above, which threatens vision or visual function, is disqualifying
.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 January 2013 00:44
 

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