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Stevens-Johson’s Syndrome
Wednesday, 15 April 2009 00:49

 

What is Stevens-Johson’s Syndrome? What is the treatment for Stevens-Johson’s Syndrome?

 

Stevens-Johson’s Syndrome is a severe multisystem allergic reaction caused by drugs or an infection. It often results in death (30% of the time.) This is an autoimmune disease that targets skin and mucus membranes. Common triggers for Steven’s Johnson are penicillin, sulfonamides, anticonvulsants, herpes virus, streptococcus, and echo virus. One will experience a skin rash, red eyes, conjunctivitis, foreign body sensation, tearing, and reduced vision. This condition will often form symblepharons. Serious cases can cause a permanent decrease in vision. Treatment involves hospitalization and treating the underlining infection. Topical antibiotic and steroid ointments are common.

 

Treatment

Hospitalization

Treat underlining condition

Topical antibiotic ointments

Topical steroids

Break symblepharons

 

Last Updated on Sunday, 13 January 2013 22:38
 

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